Renovations to Temporarily Close Hospital’s Behavioral Health Unit Beginning March 12

Leonardtown, Maryland (March 9, 2018)MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital’s inpatient Behavioral Health Unit will be closed for approximately three weeks beginning March 12 as renovations to the unit get underway. Due to mandatory hospital regulations, the unit will be receiving new ceilings and new flooring. The hospital’s daytime Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP) will continue uninterrupted as the construction is taking place.

While the work is being conducted, patients coming to the Emergency Department who need an intensive, inpatient program will be referred to other area psychiatric facilities, including MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center in Clinton, which was recently named one of U.S. News & World Reports’ Best Regional Hospitals.

“MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital recognizes that mental health plays an important role in the continued wellness of our community and we regret any inconveniences the construction may cause for our patients,” said Stephen Michaels, MD, chief operating officer and chief medical officer for MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital. “We would like to assured our community that we will continue to provide the best care possible and connect patients with the needed services during this time.”

Visit MedStarStMarys.org/MentalHealth for more information about behavioral health services offered at MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital.

About MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital
MedStar St. Mary's Hospital (MSMH) is a full-service community hospital, delivering state-of-the-art emergency, acute inpatient and outpatient care in Leonardtown, Maryland. Nestled in a waterside community, MedStar St. Mary's provides advanced technology with a dedication to excellence in all services provided. The not-for-profit hospital has been named among the nation’s Top 100 Hospitals™ and is an eight time recipient of the prestigious Delmarva Medicare Excellence Award. In addition, MSMH received the Maryland Performance Excellence award at the Platinum level in 2014 – the highest in the state. Our staff is committed to providing quality and compassionate medical care for all patients by coupling innovation with our outstanding team of Medical Staff members, associates and volunteers. 

Valley Lee Couple Shares Story of Recovery and the Importance of CPR

‘It Came On With No Warning’

Gloria and Francis Bean were walking on July 4 — a typical sticky summer day, like many in Southern Maryland — when, without warning, Francis went into cardiac arrest.

They’d just completed a walk around Francis’ brother’s farm: a pleasant routine for the Valley Lee couple. Francis typically joins his wife for an hour before Gloria completes another 30 minutes on her own.

The two stood chatting on Independence Day when, as Gloria recalls, Francis suddenly collapsed, grasping at his wife’s shirt as he fell. He was not breathing.

“There were no warning signs,” Francis says. “You know how, with heart attacks or cardiac events, there are symptoms or warnings? There were none.”

Gloria has spent 36 years as a registered nurse at MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital, but this patient in sudden distress was her husband. They were just a five-minute walk from their own home, but it might as well have been miles. “We didn’t take our cell phones,” she says.

Driven by adrenaline, Gloria began cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): the technique of administering chest compressions and giving breaths to assist a person who has stopped breathing or is experiencing a cardiac event. CPR restores oxygenated blood flow to the vital organs by pumping blood through the body, and/or giving breaths to oxygenate the blood being pumped.

“I was probably out there for 15 minutes,” Gloria says, “but then I really thought I needed to get help.”

She sprinted to find her brother-in-law and call 911, then returned to continue CPR. It took an additional 10 minutes of mouth-to-mouth before first responders could arrive.

“You’ve never been so happy to see anyone in your life,” Gloria says.

Members of the Second District Fire Department and Rescue Squad — where Francis has also volunteered — revived him using a defibrillator. He was then transported to the Emergency Department at MedStar St. Mary’s, where he was seen by Dr. Daniel Geary, medical director of the Emergency Department, and the emergency staff before being flown to MedStar Washington Hospital Center.

The Cardiac Catheterization Lab at the MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute determined Francis had a 100 percent blockage in one artery. Surgery was required to clear it and place a stent to keep the artery open. Francis was able to be discharged after just two days with a LifeVest — a wearable defibrillator — providing protection and peace of mind while he recovered at home.

Three months later, Francis smiles at his wife of 35 years. The pair has four grown children and three grandchildren. How grateful they are that Gloria was by Francis’ side that day.

“It’s so important that CPR was started immediately. Your chances of recovery drop with every minute until help arrives,” he says.

Francis started a supervised exercise program at the Grace Anne Dorney Pulmonary & Cardiac Rehabilitation Center at MedStar St. Mary’s, where his vital signs are monitored during low-impact routines. The intensity of his workouts has been gradually increased to safely return him to an active lifestyle.

The couple advocates strongly that everyone take a CPR course to be able to assist others in a crisis. At least 10 of the Beans’ family members have become certified since July.

“You never know when you’re going to need CPR,” says Gloria. “You think the skills aren’t going to come back to you, but they do. You never know whose life you’re going to save — it could be your loved one.”

Today, the Beans are back to walking again: an hour around the farm and home again.

“But we take a cell phone now,” Gloria smiles.

To learn more about cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, visit MedStarStMarys.org/GraceAnneDorney.

For CPR class availability and other opportunities at MedStar St. Mary’s, go to MedStarStMarys.org/Calendar.

Live Q&A Jan. 23 with Sports Medicine Specialists to Address Keeping Young Players Safe

Leonardtown, Maryland (Jan. 2, 2018) – A free presentation on preventing, diagnosing and treating sports injuries in children and young adults will be held 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 23, in the auditorium of Leonardtown High School.  

“Protecting Your Student Athlete,” an informative talk geared toward parents, will be led by Emmanuel Atiemo, MD, and Christian Glaser, DO. The physicians will discuss preventing and treating common sports injuries like concussions, fractures, tears, strains and more, accompanied by engaging question-and-answer sessions with attendees.

Dr. Atiemo, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist with MedStar Orthopaedic Institute, has extensive athletic team experience as a team physician for the Baltimore Ravens and Washington Nationals, among others. A graduate of the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Dr. Atiemo completed his residency at Temple University Hospital and fellowship at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore.

Dr. Glaser is a board-certified internal and sports medicine specialist with the MedStar Medical Group at Charlotte Hall. He is a team doctor for the Maryland Jockey Club. A graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Dr. Glaser completed his residency at Crozer-Chester Medical Center and his fellowship at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia.

 

Contact

Holly Meyer, Director
Marketing, PR & Philanthropy
301-475-6010
[email protected]

 

Couple Finds Compassionate Care at Hospice House

When Diane Haderly’s cancer returned, she chose not to undergo treatment to extend her life, but instead wanted to spend her last few months traveling and enjoying life with her husband, John.

Upon removal of a tumor on her pancreas and completion of six months of chemotherapy, everything seemed to be fine for Diane Haderly. She felt great. After all, the Lexington Park resident beat breast cancer 17 years ago. This time around she wasn’t as fortunate.

A follow-up scan showed the cancer had spread. Diane discussed her options with John, her husband of 38 years. She could undergo an even more intense treatment or do nothing. The treatment could extend her life a few months, but Diane decided it wasn’t worth it.

“It came down to quality of life,” said John, recalling the toll the six months of chemo took on Diane. “She always said if she ever got really sick, she wanted to die at Hospice House.” So the couple went to Hospice House, learned about hospice services and chose her options for care. Being terminal, Diane was eligible for hospice care immediately, although she felt great. In fact, in the beginning, John said Diane would answer the door and the hospice nurse would ask to see the patient while Diane answered, “I am the patient.”

Diane and John sailed and traveled in their motorhome during their time together. They visited their blended family of five children and eight grandchildren, discussing Diane’s decision and what she wanted in addition to celebrating family occasions. Thanks to their hospice connection, John, a retired Navy officer with no medical training, always felt confident should they ever encounter an emergency while traveling. “Whenever we left home,” said John, “I let hospice know our routes and our destinations. They set up hospice services for us in those areas, although we never had to use them.”

According to Hospice and Palliative Care Interim Director Kathy Franzen, BSN, RN, a great number of patients and their families never discuss end-of-life options. Instead, decisions are crisis based, made under duress in the Intensive Care Center or the Emergency Department. “This places a huge burden on others.” Kathy and her staff ask patients and families “What’s important to you?” to help with decisions about palliative or hospice care. “This question can help with one of the most important conversations of our life,” said Kathy.

If unsure how to begin end-of-life conversations, she highly recommends The Conversation Project website at TheConversationProject.org for several helpful resources. “All of hospice care is palliative care, but all of palliative care is not hospice care at all,” Kathy said. Palliative care should start at the beginning of any serious or chronic illness. To be eligible for hospice, a terminally ill patient with approximately six months to live must have a physician referral.

Just as she wanted, Diane Haderly was at Hospice House for her final days. All of her family, including the dog, were able to come and say their goodbyes. John was so taken with his wife’s care that when his 95-year-old mother-in-law was in a nursing home dying of lung cancer, he arranged for her to go to Hospice House.

Once again, he was grateful for their skill and compassion. As a thank you, John helps care for the baby grand piano in the Hospice House living room, seeing that it stays well-tuned for all to enjoy. Diane loved music and John, a musician, served as the Navy Band’s tour director for most of his military career. “Hospice staff treated my wife, myself and our entire family with dignity,” John said. “They honored Diane’s wishes, provided comfort and support, and made the transition tolerable for our entire family. I’m also proud of our community for building the Hospice House. It’s a gift.”

Visit HospiceofStMarys.org for more information about hospice and palliative care.

Education Sessions Offered For Aphasia Awareness Month

Aphasia Month

Information sessions available June 28 and 30

June is National Aphasia Awareness Month and MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital will be offering information sessions Tuesday, June 28, and Thursday, June 30, to help educate individuals about the communication disorder, which affects approximately 2 million Americans.

Aphasia is an acquired condition that impairs a person’s ability to process language, but does not affect intelligence. The most common cause of aphasia is stroke, however, it can also result from head injury, brain tumor or other neurological causes. Many people with aphasia have Parkinson’s Disease, cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy. Individuals with aphasia often have difficulty reading, writing, speaking or understanding.

Individuals who are interested in learning more about aphasia and strategies to communicate with people who have aphasia, may stop by the hospital’s Atrium, which is located next to the Café at Buena Vista, between noon and 1 p.m. on June 28 or 30. A speech language pathologist will be available to offer information and interested individuals may also sign up for an aphasia support group.

Learn more about communication disorders and the Aphasia Clinic at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C.

 

Media Contact
Holly Meyer

301-475-6010
[email protected]

About MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital
MedStar St. Mary's Hospital (MSMH) is a full-service community hospital, delivering state-of-the-art emergency, acute inpatient and outpatient care in Leonardtown, Maryland. Nestled in a waterside community, MedStar St. Mary's provides advanced technology with a dedication to excellence in all services provided. The not-for-profit hospital has been named among the nation’s Top 100 Hospitals™ and is an eight time recipient of the prestigious Delmarva Medicare Excellence Award. In addition, MSMH received the Maryland Performance Excellence award at the Platinum level in 2014 – the highest in the state. Our staff is committed to providing quality and compassionate medical care for all patients by coupling innovation with our outstanding team of Medical Staff members, associates and volunteers. 

Alzheimer’s Support Group

Designed to empower caregivers and those with Alzheimer's and related dementia, this free support group will provide education and social and emotional support in a safe and confidential environment. Light refreshments will be provided. Call 301-475-6019 for more details.